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How to Build A Successful Business or  top business man?

Starting a business and becoming successful is often part of the American Dream. But there is a difference between starting a business and building a successful business. Many businesses fail within the first few years of existence due to the lack of planning for the long-term. top business man  in Top there is not enough vision and there is not enough done to strengthen the business properly from the ground up.

successful entrepreneur person

If you want to start a business there is an easy way to get a better understanding of why some businesses fail and others don’t. When starting a business think about it similar to building a house. If done right it is protecting you against any kind of storm or danger of the outside world and will last for a long time. It offers shelter and protection. For you and your business that could be translated to that you want to have a business that is able to weather economical ups and downs (=storm) and that will provide income to pay the bills (shelter and protection).

How To Become An Entrepreneur

When building a house there are several different steps you need to follow to have the house build. You know you want a house, but you got to pick a location and get an architect to plan everything out. In the business world that would be: you know you want to start a business, but you have to come up with a business idea and work out a business plan. The next thing for the house would be to build the foundation (and eventually the basement) for the house. In the business world – you got to build the initial infrastructure (example: connecting with vendors, find a manufacturer for your product, create a sales team, rent office space, get a delivery truck, etc.). Once that is in place you able to actually do business and earn some money. But you are not completely done yet. You need to build a frame, put in windows and you also need a roof on house. For your business this means that you pay off debt, improve business processes and get professional help when needed (example: find a tax accountant, select a payroll service, etc.).

becoming a successful entrepreneur

Once the house is build you probably want to fill it with furniture and make it livable for the future. Nobody wants to sleep on the floor, right. Again translating this to the business world it could mean that you invest money you earned back into your business. You buy machinery instead of leasing it. Eventually you buy a building, hire more staff, develop more products, move into new markets, build up a high cash reserve, and buy other businesses and so forth. This is often the step where winners and losers separate. Re-investing money into the business is a key factor for success. If you go and spend all the money on your own salary to buy things you have nothing to go back to when the economy slips into a recession or if disaster strikes.

becoming a successful entrepreneur

The successful business owner has build up a cash reserve or can borrow money from bank – securing loans with the assets of the business. Going back to building a house this pretty much matches the same efforts. You pay off your mortgage and have equity available to eventually borrow against when emergency arises. Emergencies do not include paying off credit cards to use them again or to buy a car. Financially responsible you should be looking at the long term and not finance short-term goods with long-term debt.

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How To Become An Entrepreneur

Successful Entrepreneurs Are...

1. Visionaries

They see beyond obstacles. They focus on possibilities rather than
dwelling on limitations.

We hear many stories of men and women who have created great
enterprises from ideas others had rejected or said will never work. We are
inspired the most by stories of those who succeeded against all odds. As
an entrepreneur, you have the need to create, to start something that never
was or to improve upon an exciting product or concept. To bring forth
something new does not come without challenges.

Choose not to dwell on what you don’t have (lack of money, time, support
or other resources). Make a choice to focus on what needs to be done to
manifest your idea and then make it happen! No more excuses! Stop
blaming others, your circumstances or yourself for why things don’t turn
out as you thought they would. When we choose to focus on abundance
rather than lack, we harness the power to create and attract what we need
to achieve success. Those with sight see what is, but those with vision see
what can be. What are the possibilities in your life, what are the
possibilities for your business?

2. Strategists

They plan well, and execute effectively.

Sun Tzu, in his book, “The Art of War” he wrote, “the art of war is a
matter of life and death, a road to either safety or to ruin. The art of war is
governed by five critical factors. These are the way, the weather, the
terrain, the leadership and the discipline." Without a solid business
strategy, you become, by default, reactive rather than proactive. Reactive
businesses cannot grow into sustainable and competitive enterprises
because there is no roadmap to do so. Sun Tzu's five critical factors apply to contemporary business strategy as much as they do to historical military operations. To drive your business
using the art of strategy, it is essential to establish or clarify the overall
vision and goals of the organization (the way); understand the operating
environment facing the business (the terrain); develop objectives and
specific strategies for the organization to address (the weather); ensure
strong management to guide and motivate staff and to implement the
strategies in a timely manner (the leadership); and develop a robust
organizational structure, effective supply chain management and ensure
that performance is monitored against the stated objectives (the
discipline).1

Entrepreneurs often have great ideas, but in a zest to make it a reality, fail
to plan properly. This failure to plan can sink even the best of ideas.
Address the 5 critical factors as soon as possible by creating your strategic
plan if you haven’t already done so. If you have already created your
strategic plan, it doesn’t hurt to give it the once over to ensure all the
critical factors have been addressed.

3. Problem - Solvers

They see a problem as an opportunity for growth and strategically seek
resolutions.

Are you solutions-oriented? How do you react when faced with a business
problem? Problems are just opportunities for growth and development in
disguise. Problems test you; they challenge you to change the way that
you think. There are thousands, if not millions of great inventions born
from perceived problems or accidents.

George de Mestral, a Swiss engineer, returned from a walk one day in
1948 and found some cockleburs clinging to his cloth jacket. When de
Mestral loosened them, he examined one under his microscope. The
cocklebur is a maze of thin strands with burrs (or hooks) on the ends that
cling to fabrics or animal fur. By the accident of the cockleburs sticking to
his jacket, George de Mestral recognized the potential for a practical new
fastener. It took eight years to experiment, develop, and perfect the
invention, which consists of two strips of nylon fabric. VELCRO, the
name de Mestral gave his product, is the brand most people in the United
States know. It is strong, easily separated, lightweight, durable, and
washable, comes in a variety of colors, and won’t jam.2

Learn from George. Begin to look forward to your next problem; if you
look carefully enough, it may be a great blessing in disguise. What
creative and/or strategic solutions can you come up with and implement?

4. Risk -Takers

They are not afraid to challenge the status quo nor, are they afraid to take
the road less traveled.

The great people of this world are not the ones who did what had always
been done, they are the ones who stood up and said, “how I can do this
differently”? Great people are bold, they dare to dream, and they are
courageous in their endeavors. Little people are timid; they are scared to
dream and to avoid disappointment they refrain from great endeavors. It is
better to try and risk not reaching the desired end, than never to try and
never know what could have been. The level of success you may desire to
achieve may not have been paved by any before you. You may not be only
taking the road less traveled, but a road never traveled.

In order to succeed, sometimes you have to break the cycle of what
everyone says is fact and believe in what you know to be true. Christopher
Columbus knew the truth that the world was round even when the facts of
his age said it was flat. What would have happened if Columbus accepted
the norm and didn’t challenge the status quo? This is not to say do not
heed good advice, as a matter of fact it is wise to seek good counsel. But
there are times when we have to make choices, small ones and big ones
alike that are contrary to popular opinion. These are the times when you
must separate the facts from the truth. The fact may be that you have a
great business idea, but no money to get it off the ground; however, the
truth is that you live surrounded by an abundance of all you need to get
your business off the ground but you have to learn how to tap into it. This
is where you must be creative, do something that you have never done
before; boldly seek partnerships, mentors and coaches to help you. Are
you afraid to take bold risks? Will you be content with playing it safe and
spending the rest of your life wondering what could have been?

5. Servant-Leaders

They realize serving precedes leading.

A servant leader does not just focus on the bottom line but focuses on how
she can be of service to others. A servant leadership model is an inverted
pyramid in which the president of an organization is at the lowest point of
the triangle and the customer is at the broadest edge as opposed to your
traditional leader on top of the organization model.

Robert Greenleaf is credited with the term servant leader. In his book,
Servant Leadership, Greenleaf noticed that the most successful
managers led in a very different way - they led through service rather than
through positional authority.

Resolve today that your leadership, as an entrepreneur, is not purely self-
satisifying and profit motivating. Leadership is not about control and
manipulation, as it is only in service that one becomes great. Resolve to
be of service to your employees, shareholders, clients, suppliers and all
those you come in contact with.

If you are interested in learning more about servant leadership many
universities even community programs offer courses on the subject.
It is a worthwhile investment.

6. Survivors

They don't quit. Instead, they fail forward to success.

Your first business venture may not work out as planned. Maybe neither
will your second venture or third. It is important to know that because
things don’t always turn out as planned, it does not mean you are a failure.
Your business may have failed, but you have not! Smart entrepreneurs
learn from what didn’t work instead of throwing in the towel all together.
Robert Kiyosaki actually said in one of his books that, unlike employees
entrepreneurs get paid to fail. What a strange statement, but it is true!
Entrepreneurs learn something valuable every time things go awry. As
humans we are programmed to learn by our mistakes more than our
successes. Did you know how to ride a bike the first time you got on one?
Could you use chopsticks as effortlessly as you can now? No! You learned
from your mistakes and eventually, you got it right.
By giving up, you throw away the opportunity to ever succeed. Every
time you stumble or fall in your entrepreneurial undertakings, rejoice, as
you are one step closer to success! You may have to change what you are
doing slightly or dramatically but whatever you do, don't quit!

1 [http://www.grantthornton.ca/mgt_papers/MIP_template.asp?MIPID=29]
2 http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/story015.htm

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How To Be A Good Entrepreneur

Most people think Santa Claus only works one night a year. Nothing could be further from the truth. Sure, product distribution takes place on one magical night, but Santa's operation runs year round and is one of the largest manufacturing and distribution operations in the world.
You've probably never considered the fact that Santa is the CEO of a large organization that not only distributes a vast assortment of products throughout the world, but does so in a single night with just a sleigh and eight tiny reindeer. Sam Walton would have killed to have Santa's logistics manual.
Do I believe in Santa? You bet your red longjohns I do. I especially believe in Santa's entrepreneurial spirit. Just consider all he does from an entrepreneurial point of view and I think you will start to believe, too.
Santa Is His Own Company Spokesperson
Santa is a brilliant marketer and knows that his image is the best marketing tool he has. No other face is as recognizable and no other entrepreneur has inspired so many songs. You'll never hear "An Ode To Jack Welch" on the radio ten times a day.
Santa's Customers Love Him
Just say his name around a group of kids and watch their little faces light up like Rudolph's nose. You will never see Bill Gates get that kind of reaction. Heck, he can't even make his own kids smile.
Santa Sets The Bar For All Entrepreneurs
When you list the traits of the perfect entrepreneur, Santa gets the highest marks. He has passion for his work. He loves his customers and will go to great lengths to make sure they are happy. He has the ability to spot consumer trends and bring products to market quickly. He can lead a large organization with a wink of his eye. He inspires those around him. He is tireless. He is dedicated. He is loyal. He is persistent. And above all, he is jolly. Name another jolly entrepreneur (other than Dave Thomas of Wendy's fame). I bet you can't.
Santa Is A Great Leader
Can you imagine trying to manage a few hundred giddy elves who are shut in year round and spend their off hours drinking spiked hot chocolate and doing who knows what with fairy dust? It would be enough to drive even the best of entrepreneurs to hide out at the North Pole. Somehow Santa manages the task without pulling his whiskers out. I expect he has a management system that promotes from within. The hard working elves get into management. The slackers are stuck cleaning up after the reindeer.
Santa Perfected "Just In Time" Manufacturing
Santa heads up one of the largest, most diverse manufacturing operations in the world. His product lines range from rag dolls to toy trains to rocking horses to baseball gloves for the little kids, to iPods and cellphones and diamond rings for us big kids. Santa's factory runs year round, twenty four hours a day, seven days a week and never, ever suffers from cost overrun or production shut downs. Santa perfected the "just in time" method of production that is used by many of the world's largest manufacturers today.
Santa Pioneered Global Product Distribution
Santa is the king of single channel distribution. How else could he deliver millions of presents to good little girls and boys all around the world on a single night? Santa's distribution process is a closely-guarded secret (elves and reindeer are required to sign iron-clad nondisclosure agreements), but I expect it involves a highly detailed logistics plan and the best CRM software on the planet. You never hear about Santa calling up a kid and telling them a present is backordered until July.
Santa's Delivery & Tracking Systems Are Second To None
If you think FedEx is number one at tracking packages think again. Santa's track record is spotless. He has never, ever missed a single delivery or left a box sitting on the porch in the rain. Every package is delivered in perfect shape, right under the tree.
Santa Wrote The Book On Customer Satisfaction
Santa proudly boasts a 100% perfect customer satisfaction rating. You never hear about class action lawsuits and Better Business Bureau complaints against St. NIck. Santa makes sure that his customers are happy and if they aren't, he'll come back next year to make things right. If JD Power could find him, I'm sure they would give Santa their Christmas Customer Satisfaction Award.
Santa Claus Is Watching You
Not everyone believes that Santa is the perfect entrepreneur. There are those kids who complain that Santa never brings what they ask for, but we grown ups know that Santa brings the gift that is deserved, not necessarily the gift that is asked for.
Here's a little Christmas tip from your Uncle Tim, boys and girls, ladies and gents: If you get a lump of coal in your stocking this year it's because you were bad and that's what you deserved.
It was not because Santa dropped the ball.
Merry Christmas everybody!

Myths About Entrepreneurs

Successful Entrepreneurs Stories

Financial advisors often find themselves consulting to successful entrepreneurs about how to continue to grow their assets after the business has been sold or taken over through a carefully planned succession strategy. But developing a small business (defined here as having less than $50 million in annual revenues) is not so simple.

After the initial burst of business success and survival in the first three years, many small businesses encounter struggles that can leave them feeling isolated. What can assist a 30-year old consulting firm whose personal presence and paper products face a changing world of electronic presence and high travel costs by helping them with development of electronic products? What can encourage a small playground equipment manufacturer to move from $1 million to $2 then $5 million in annual revenues by helping her with facility expansion issues? What can help a successful cookie baker beat the competition through strategic partners, cause marketing and high tech kitchen equipment?

Small Business Development Centers can.

According to the Small Business Administration these SBDC's gave face-to-face help to more than 247,000 clients last year. A treasury of business answers lies waiting and ready to assist at 1,100 top colleges and universities across the United States, according to the SBA. These centers are funded by a combination of federal, state and local government monies as well as with private sector dollars.

Here are just few examples from the State of Wisconsin. The University of Wisconsin at Whitewater hosts a Small Business Development Center at www.uwwsbdc.com [http://www.uwwsbdc.com/] Its email is ask-sbdc@uww.edu This center is also affiliated with the Wisconsin Innovation Service Center, that "takes pride in an extremely high rate of client satisfaction...nearly 75% of clients have been referred by former clients and professionals. The Wisconsin Innovation Service Center charges an "affordable fee" to provide companies with enough information for improved product and market development decisions.

A few diverse examples of this university-related treasury of successes include these:

  1. A local gardener gained international attention for a unique gardening tool.
  2. An innovative drywall finishing product offers significant benefits over competition.
  3. A new product helps a honey producer grow.
  4. A business in the electrical equipment industry finds new customer segments.
  5. Investors and inventors find value in a flooring company start-up.
  6. An environmental product company breaks past the $15 million mark with a new product.
  7. An ornithology hobby becomes a successful business venture.
  8. An outdoor equipment manufacturer finds a potential acquisition.
  9. Customer purchase decisions and perceptions are revealed to a manufacturer.
  10. An automotive aftermarket tool gains distribution outlets across the U.S.
  11. A "hot" tool is offered to the propane and plumbing industries.

Part of the success of these entrepreneurs and a couple of hundred thousand others is due to the one-on-one relationship of these advisors with their entrepreneurial clients. Developing business plans, wading through loan applications, securing critical market research, exploring product design options, identifying a lasting competitive edge---these are typical of the services that SBDC's can provide to the entrepreneur.

These services are nothing to be sneezed at. In another state, South Carolina, the economic impact on the state's economy in 2005 alone was $86 million, resulting in a return on investment of $121.11 for every dollar of state funding, according to Regional Director Jill Burroughs as quoted in the Greenville News. Further explaining the power of the program, Burroughs said that breaks down to $45.7 million in capital formation, 1038 jobs created, nearly $25 million in wages paid, $869,000 in additional sales taxes and $15 million in contracts awarded to 381 businesses.

SBDC's are located in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, Samoa and the US Virgin Islands. If you conservatively cut the impact of South Carolina in half and multiplied by the 50 states, you would have a $2.1 BILLION impact.

This is a powerful treasury of real riches that spills over to the rest of the economy from the struggles of entrepreneurs who refused to let their dreams be defeated by the obstacles they encountered. They got help.

5 Characteristics Of An Entrepreneur